Bath

Scotland

Most people don’t realize that there is a lot of hidden beauty in the United Kingdom. You would normally think of the most popular places: London, Scotland, Dublin, maybe Manchester or Liverpool and that small country known for dragons: Wales. But there are so many more beautiful places that deserve our attention.
My long-term goal (one day.. in regards to the United Kingdom), is to rent an adorable (preferably periwinkle) car and road trip across the whole thing, paying the most attention to small villages and towns hidden in between the fields of grassy mountains; all whilst hoping to run into a prince and fulfill my lifelong dream of finally becoming a princess. We shall see.

Little History Lesson:

Bath, England. Most people, myself included, probably have never heard of this city or any relevance behind it. Snuggled up in the southwest part of England, Bath is known for its 18th-century architecture and its baths. The Romans discovered it the 1st century AD and used the natural hot spring as a thermal spa; strangely during the Middle Ages was used a center for the wool industry and now it is considered an UNESCO World Heritage Site. Today it houses one of the world’s best preserved Roman bath houses.

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To be honest with you the main reason for me wanting to visit Bath is because  I have an absurd imagination and my bucket list contains the most far-fetched wild ideas one can think of. For example: have a shower in Bath, England. A shower you ask? Why not a bath? Well eh I like to be difficult. Plus I didn’t actually know that baths were a thing in Bath, England and figured finding a bath tub in a hostel would be a challenge and further fuel my icky attitude toward the habit of a bath itself (you sit in your own germs?)

Arriving in Bath:
Bath itself is a small town and an expensive place to fly into. Therefore the most economically efficient way to get there is through Bristol. Madrid to Bristol. Bristol to Bath. If you search properly and with enough time in advance then you can find tickets at a fairly cheap price. EasyJet…2hrs…€50
screen-shot-2017-02-21-at-12-25-04-pmOnce you land at the Bristol airport (be prepared and unlike myself know that the Bristol airport is about thirty minutes outside the actually city of Bristol) you will need to take a bus to Bath. Walk outside towards the end of the airport and you’ll see a big green double decker bus called A1 airport transfer. Buy tickets onboard; they cost about £7 one way to Bath (the last stop). Easy peasy lemon squeezy.

Staying.
We stayed at Bath Backpackers. Since the town itself is so small, there are not a majority of hostels for frugal human beings like myself to take advantage of. But this one worked. Overall, lovely hostel. It’s an old building converted to a hostel. Meaning…very little outlets and spotty wifi. The showers were interesting. But the hair dryer was powerful.

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Day One: Arrive. Sleep. Eventful I know.

Day Two: Our day trip to Stonehenge.
This day trip worked out perfectly. We left the middle of Bath around 13:00 which gave us all morning to roam around. And since we got a full night rest, up and early to explore the city. First coffee because no day starts without an adorable cafe to enjoy a cup of energy.
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Located conveniently next to the Abbey: breakfast. Consisting of much-needed caffeine and empanadas. (Empanadas for breakfast…we’ve converted, we know).
The Roman Baths: Obviously it rained. The skies must have known I wanted to take a shower in Bath, England.
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There is even a museum dedicated to the educational side of the natural waters. It is included in the price of entrance, so get your learn on!

and at the very end of the museum you have the opportunity to taste the natural waters that gave life to the Romans so many years ago…although it tastes awful.

Stonehenge: Our little purple bus left in front of the Abbey Hotel and took about 45 minutes to drive to Stonehenge. Pack some snacks if you are a constant eater like myself. (We chose some: olives, crackers, humus, turkey slices for me and salami slices for Katy). (Surprisingly super fully and cost less than £7).
Along the way our driver pointed stuff out here and there, left and right. But the windows were too steamed from all the carbon dioxide a loaded bus lets out and I can’t handle the roller coaster of bus; so nap time. It’s mostly green with sheep anyways.
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The glorious moment arriving to Stonehenge. I had to pee so badly it is hard to recall my feelings. Grab your free audio guide (which is filled with useful and helpful information, so I’d highly recommend it). From the museum/gift shop of Stonehenge the actual stones are located about two miles north. Don’t fret you lazy humans. They have a shuttle bus that goes back and forth. Prepare yourself. I clearly went cray with the lens (also it was raining so excuse the droplets off water that ended up on the pictures); and for a good reason. jaw drop and scroll onward.

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The whole concept of man itself is insane. If you hate to read or history and thoughts old ancient ruins stroll on down my lovely friends. But for those of you that are blown away but the idea of old; man let’s ramble! As you walk through the ground of Stonehenge listening to the archeologists and historians break down the idea of this strange mystery; you can’t help it but wonder. The idea that man created this weird circle of stone thousands of years ago. For what? We don’t know why. Which makes it all that much more exciting. A group of people (literally the same as you and I) without he help of technology or ideas, came up with a concept to move and assemble rocks to create some sort of meaning. These civilized humans had communities. Homes. Studies. Tools. Worked together as one. To create something that continues to baffle us today. As you walk along that ground, imagine what life was like for them. You are walking in the same footsteps as a woman or man once did thousands of years ago. Remarkable. Humans, blow my mind.  End ramble.
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For those of you that don’t know anything about Stonehenge (don’t feel embarrassed, most people don’t). Allow me to break it down for you with some interesting facts of knowledge:

  • It is a prehistoric site
  • Believed to be constructed in 3000BC to 2000BC
  • Stonehenge was built-in phases
  • It’s a mystery how the stones got there but there are many theories
  • Darwin studied worms here img_7858img_7292img_7316img_7317img_7313

Put this on your bucket list. You won’t regret it.
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You get back into bath around 18:00 which in the winter/fall season the sun is setting or has already set. We explored around a little bit, confirming my nonexistent skills in night photograph and just headed back.

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Day Three: Due to an unfortunate experience in our hostel in the wee hours of the morn (not related to the hostel itself but rather the guests). Hostel etiquette people, you’re smarter than that,  come on. We were up rather early and just decided to check out around 9AM. Nothing was open in Bath at 9AM. Nothing. So we just wandered to the train station and departed to Cardiff, Wales.
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Until next time Bath

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6 thoughts on “Bath

  1. So enjoyed your post! Stonehenge is absolutely on my bucket list, as well as the other really old historical sites in Great Britain. Loved seeing your photos.

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  2. I’m actually visiting Bath soon and your post makes me even more excited to visit! I’m so glad I found it because now I have a few more pointers for when I get there – especially since I’m super excited for the Roman Baths & Stonehenge!

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  3. Oh I loved Bath! We went there about 7 years ago and fell in love with the town and the region. Did you also develop addiction to scones? I see you had classic lovely British weather. 🙂 Anyway, I enjoyed reading your blog and reviving old travel memories.

    Cheers,
    Anja

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